pesticides

Guam Pesticide Safety Education Program (PSEP)

The Guam Pesticide Safety Education Program (PSEP) is a service provided by the University of Guam Cooperative Extension Service. We offer training courses leading to certification in the following areas. The actual testing and certification of pesticide applicators is done by the Guam Environmental Protection Agency.

Click here for PSEP Contact Information

Click here for information on pesticide laws and regulations for Guam

Core: This is the prerequisite course that needs to be taken in order to receive one’s certification card for a particular category. Without taking this course you cannot get a pesticide applicator license.
Next course: TBA
Core Manual

Private License: Persons using or supervising those using restricted use pesticides for the purpose of producing any agricultural commodity on property owned or rented by him or his employer. Training and manual are identical to those for Category 1a.

Commercial Licenses:

Category 1a (Commercial Agricultural Plant Pest Control): Persons purchasing, using, or supervising the use of restricted use pesticides in the production of agricultural crops, as well as non-crop agricultural lands.
Next course: TBA
Category 1a/Private Applicator Manual

Pesticide Laws and Regulations for Guam

Pesticide use on Guam is regulated by the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and the Guam Pesticide Act of 2007.  Theses laws are enforced by the Guam Environmental Protection Agency (GEPA) under the authority of the Guam Pesticide Regulations of 2010.

GEPA should be contacted for any regulatory or legal questions regarding pesticide use on Guam.

 

 

Pesticide Residue Risk Analysis

The Division of Environmental Health of the Guam Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPSS) collected samples of fresh produce from a fresh vegetable stand on Guam on March 24, 2009 and sent these to a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) laboratory for pesticide residue analysis. FDA detected less than 0.01 ppm of permethrin on what was described as either "pechay "or "bok choy" and 0.03 ppm of bifenthrin on what was described as "Kam Kong". These pesticides are not approved for use on the vegetables on which they were found.

The attached analysis indicates that the detected residues pose minimal risk to Guam's consumers.

Pesticide Safety Tips To Keep Your Family Out of Danger

Pesticide Safety Tips To Keep Your Family Out of Danger

By Lee S. Yudin
Pacific Daily News
July 25, 1998

Pesticides are chemical substances used to kill or greatly reduce pests. For example, insecticides are used to control insects, herbicides are used to eliminate weeds and Rodenticides to kill mice and rats. The misuse of these chemicals can be extremely dangerous to humans and to our environment.

Pesticides can enter the body in four major ways: oral exposure (when you swallow a pesticide), ocular exposure (when you get a pesticide into your eyes), and dermal exposure (when you get a pesticide on your skin). Pesticide poisoning most commonly occurs in children under five years of age. A simple rule that will help reduce the risk of the number of pesticide poisonings is to keep all pesticides locked up.

Below, I have listed Pesticide Safety Tips that has a homeowner you need to be aware of when either storing, using, or disposing pesticide containers.

Home Pesticide Safety

Home Pesticide Safety

By Lee S. Yudin, Ph.D.

Pacific Daily News

November 27, 1999

 

Pesticides are chemical substances used to kill or greatly reduce pests. For example, Insecticides are used to control insects; Herbicides are used to eliminate weeds; and Rodenticides to kill mice and rats. The misuse of these chemicals can be extremely dangerous to humans and to our environment.

Pesticides can enter the body in four major ways: oral exposure (when you swallow a pesticide); inhalation exposure (when you inhale a pesticide); ocular exposure (when you get a pesticide into your eyes); and dermal exposure (when you get a pesticide on your skin). Pesticide poisoning most commonly occurs in children under five years of age. A simple rule that will help reduce the risk of the number of pesticide poisonings is to keep all pesticides locked up.

Below, I have listed Pesticide Safety Tips that, as a homeowner, you need to be aware of when either storing, using, or disposing of pesticide containers.

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